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Split is one of the most beautiful towns in Croatia. It is a wonderful melting pot of the medieval past and its modern present, and has today become one of Europe's favourite holiday destinations. Unlike other coastal cities in Croatia, Split is much larger in comparison and has become a sprawling city on the stunning Dalmatian Coast. With so much to see, it is a great idea to rent a car in Split and explore this jewel at your own pace.

It's your choice: Where to go in Split

With a naval trade that once rivalled Venice, Split is rich in medieval history. You can base yourself in central Split which is very close to most of the attractions. The biggest draw is Diocletian's palace near the Split ferry port. A UNESCO World Heritage Site, it is one of the best preserved Roman palaces. The city itself grew around this historic site and is full of cobbled streets, majestic gates, imposing walls and architecture. St.Duje's Cathedral, built as a tomb for the Roman emperor Diocletian, the Peristil square, St.John's Church and the Egyptian Sphinxes are some of the top draws within the palace. Another interesting spot is the Archaeological Museum north of the town, that houses many of the Roman treasures excavated in Split. If you prefer the outdoors, head to Marjan's peak, a hill west of Split with exciting climbs rewarded with spectacular views of the coastline.

Things to do in Split

Besides exploring its historical treasures, there are a lot of outdoor activities in Split. Being a coastal town with some of Europe's highest sunshine, holiday makers are attracted to its beautiful beaches. While you can virtually get into the sparkling waters anywhere in Split, some of the more popular ones are Trstenik, Bacvice, Kastelet and Bene – all being a short drive from the town centre. Split also has a fair share of nudist beaches, the most popular being Seget and Ruskamen. Kayaking, snorkelling, sea diving and sailing are other exciting ways of enjoying the sparkling waters here. While in Split, you can try your hand at rock climbing, particularly in the dramatic limestone cliffs of Marjan Hill. This hill is also popular for the St Jeronimus caves and church.

Important Info about Split

Split is well connected by flights to major cities in Europe. You can take a flight to Split and go for a car hire in the Split airport. Split is also connected by cruises. It is a very safe place to travel on your own, drive around and stay out for long hours. Split has a lot of options for everyone. If you are opting for rock climbing activities in particular, ensure that you go with a registered agency rather than travel alone. While in Split, feasting on the local cuisine is a must. The best restaurants in Split lie between the Split old town and the bus station. You should try, in particular, the local crepe like delicacy called Soparnik and the Dalmatian gnocchi. The wineries of Dalmatia have also won a lot of acclaim recently – do try the wines from the local Plavac Mali grape variety.

Weather in Split
Facts
Country Croatia
Language Croatian/English
Currency Euro
Time-Zones CEST
Country Code +385

Good to know

Driving is a great way to explore the scenic coastal routes around Split. Cars drive on the right side of the road, with overtaking on the left. You have to carry your driving licence, car insurance certificate and age proof. Third party insurance is mandated here, and you will need to carry its relevant documents such as the Green card. Minimum driving age is 18 years, though you may need to pay a young driver's excess if less than 21. Children under 150 cm need to be seated in the back row, while seat belts are a must for all passengers. Traffic monitoring is quite strict, particularly around the city centre. Drinking and driving is strictly forbidden for people of 23 year old or less – for those above 24, alcohol limit is 0.05%. Do ensure that you stick to the speed limits as traffic police officers are known to impose on-the-spot fines around the city.

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What to visit in the surroundings of Split

Rent a car in Split and go for some amazing day trips around the city. The most acclaimed is the Split to Dubrovnik drive that takes about four hours and offers some of the best seascapes on the Dalmatian Coast. Moreover, there are eight UNESCO World Heritage Sites all within a two hour drive from Split. Within half an hour from Split, you can reach Trogir, while the cathedral of St. James in Sibenik is a bit farther. Another wonderful attraction that can be completed in a day trip is the Plitvice National Park full of emerald green transparent lakes, waterfalls and rapids (including Croatia's biggest waterfall). If you are a Game of Thrones fan, then do visit the shooting locations used in the popular TV series. This includes the Diocletian palace, fortress of Klis and the small village of Zrnovica, all within easy driving distance of each other around Split.

What to bring to your friends from Split

With an incredible rich cultural heritage, Split offers a lot of traditional souvenirs to bring back to your friends and family, A popular gift is the traditional Croatian tie or cravat – a colourful piece of fabric worn by the Croatian soldiers during the Prussian wars, and passed on today as a national heritage. Croatian boutique hand made products are becoming quite popular with travellers. These include hand crafted jewellery, lace, and wooden toys – all of which are available in Split and make for colourful gifts. Other edible options include Dalmatian wine, olive oil and the sweet Licitar heart. The latter is a heart shaped cake decorated with colours. It traces its origins to medieval monasteries where they were made by monks in wooden moulds.