Car rental in Hammamet
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Clear sunny skies, inviting blue waters, a relaxed atmosphere, traditional culture, lively entertainment and soft, sandy beaches - it's no wonder that the beautiful region of Hammamet is one of Tunisia's top holiday destinations. Located just 90 kilometres from the capital city of Tunisia, Hammamet has a lot to offer when it comes to holiday activities, water sports, nightlife and relaxation in the sun. Renting a car in Hammamet will let you explore lots of towns and villages in the area, such as the picturesque town of Soliman where you can visit the famous Malikite and Hanafite Mosques, along with the local market in the town centre. Also within driving distance is the traditional town of El Haouaria, best known for its sandstone trade. A popular spot for a day trip, it is located more northerly than Hammamet and is known for its scenic, rugged landscape overlooking the Mediterranean sea.

It's your choice: Where to go in Hammamet

Most people who visit Hammamet will either fly into Enfidha Hammamet airport, which is a short 40 minute drive from the centre of the town, or Tunis-Carthage airport which is just over an hour away by car. Hotels and resorts in the area are very well-located for exploring Hammamet's beautiful surroundings and the wild beaches of Cap Bon. The town of Nabeul, famous for its pottery, is 20 minutes away from the centre of Hammamet by car and makes a superb day trip for those wishing to pick up some locally produced handicrafts. An afternoon in Friguia Park, meanwhile, is ideal for families with young kids. This animal park is home to over 400 species including flamingos, lions, tigers, monkeys, dolphins and kangaroos, while the sea lion show is a must-see.

Things to do in Hammamet

The main attractions in Hammamet are the stunning sandy beaches with crystal clear waters and the historic town centre, the Medina. The town is a maze of small, winding streets, many of which fall inside the Medina. A 15th-century wall surrounds the Medina where you can find traditional Tunisian buildings, local shops, and crafts markets. The Hammamet folklore museum is a great local attraction, especially for families with kids, while the Friday market is a great place to sample fresh local produce and check out Tunisian crafts like pottery and textiles. Outside of Hammamet, there are a few amusement parks including the Flipper Aquapark, which is excellent for a fun family day out. The capital city of Tunis is situated just 90 kilometres away from Hammamet, making it an easy day trip for culture and history seekers, and a visit to the pottery village of Nabeul also makes for an rewarding day out. Adults and kids alike may enjoy an excursion on the Hammamet pirate ship. Take in the fresh sea air and experience life as a pirate on this authentic-looking pirate ship. Aboard the ship, guests will be treated to entertainment including traditional Tunisian music and belly dancing performances. History lovers will enjoy a visit to the archaeological site of Pupput, the original Hammamet settlement, where you can explore the ruins of the village with its mosaics, baths and cisterns. This site is located about three kilometres away from Hammamet and is ideal for a relaxed, half day trip by car. A little further afield are the remains of Kerkouane village, an early Phoenician settlement dating from the 6th century BC. The village is about an hour's drive from Hammamet.

Important info about Hammamet

Situated on the north-eastern coast of Tunisia and just 200 kilometres across the Mediterranean sea from Sicily, the coastal town of Hammamet is surrounded by very scenic, mostly flat landscapes. The coastal region to the north of Hammamet is more rugged. Arabic is the main language spoken in the region, along with French, and English is widely spoken in resort areas.

Weather in Hammamet
Facts
Country Tunisia
Language Arabic/French
Currency Tunisian dinar
Time-Zones UTC+1
Country Code +216

Good to know

In Tunisia, cars drive on the right hand side of the road. Wearing seat belts is compulsory for those in the front seats and drivers are required to carry their driving licences, insurance information and vehicle registration documents with them. The use of mobile phones while driving is strictly forbidden, though hands-free calls are permitted. There can be significant traffic during rush hour in the capital city of Tunis, but roads in Hammamet and the surrounding areas tend to be clearer. By choosing to rent a car in Hammamet, you can explore this beautiful region of Tunisia with ease and comfort.

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What to Taste in Hammamet

Tunisian cuisine has many different influences and includes flavours of the Mediterranean and North Africa, with couscous, harissa and Tunisian salads appearing on many menus in Hammamet. Other traditional dishes to sample are brik, a delicate pastry filled with tuna, egg and parsley and served with lemon, and Fricassé. This mouthwatering street food consists of a savoury fried dough filled with tuna, egg, olives, potato and harissa. Lablabi, another popular dish, is a delicious Tunisian stew made with chickpeas, olive oil, olives, capers, cumin and garlic. Restaurants, beach-side eateries and bars serving food are plentiful in Hammamet and visitors have an excellent range to choose from.

What to bring to your friends from Hammamet

Jasmine grows abundantly in this region of Tunisia, hence the name of the local marina Port Yasmine Hammamet. Many of the local shops sell jasmine tea and craft items made from the plant, which make excellent gifts. Ceramics are also popular souvenirs to bring back from Hammamet, as well as foutas (traditional striped Tunisian towels), leather goods and homewares such as richly coloured carpets and linens.